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TheGardenWhisperer
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2
May 01, 2017 7:41 pm
It's only the top 400mm you want to worry about.
Plant roots will not populate soils below that depth (often) because oxygen is too low.

Try choose something that is a little sandy and has certified organic content. You may need to build that yourself using white washed sand, zeolite, organic compost, Coir peat.
It's only the top 400mm you want to worry about.
Plant roots will not populate soils below that depth (often) because oxygen is too low.

Try choose something that is a little sandy and has certified organic content. You may need to build that yourself using white washed sand, zeolite, organic compost, Coir peat.
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7
May 01, 2017 7:37 pm
Sedums would be another option.
Mix up a bunch of Sedum foliage shapes and colours for nice effect.

Carpobrotus https://florabase.dpaw.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/2795 is another option, commonly found in many garden centres throughout Australia.
Excellent bush tucker too. The flowers are nutritious and delicious.

Drosanthemum would be another potential reliable choice.
Sedums would be another option.
Mix up a bunch of Sedum foliage shapes and colours for nice effect.

Carpobrotus https://florabase.dpaw.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/2795 is another option, commonly found in many garden centres throughout Australia.
Excellent bush tucker too. The flowers are nutritious and delicious.

Drosanthemum would be another potential reliable choice.
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6
May 01, 2017 7:32 pm
It will do what you want ;)
It will do what you want ;)
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3
May 01, 2017 7:31 pm
A bit hard to tell from just that photo. Why is that path seperate from the rest of the area?
What's behind the point of view?
Where are there windows looking out to?
When you stand at each gate, what do you want to see?
Start looking around for landscape features, like large pots, screening products, light coloured large pavers.
What is that area used for?
What do you want to use it for?
Where is the water source for irrigation?
A bit hard to tell from just that photo. Why is that path seperate from the rest of the area?
What's behind the point of view?
Where are there windows looking out to?
When you stand at each gate, what do you want to see?
Start looking around for landscape features, like large pots, screening products, light coloured large pavers.
What is that area used for?
What do you want to use it for?
Where is the water source for irrigation?
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11
May 01, 2017 7:20 pm
Yep, it will be too busy.
Keep that to waht you have. Pleaching the Waterhousia will be one hell of a feature, so leave it how it is for a few years, then decide if you want to add to it.
Yep, it will be too busy.
Keep that to waht you have. Pleaching the Waterhousia will be one hell of a feature, so leave it how it is for a few years, then decide if you want to add to it.
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21
May 01, 2017 7:17 pm
MP rotators by Hunter.
I use Toro sprinkler bodies to fit them to.

You might find Hunter MP rotators on eBay at good prices.

Remember, they need to be spaced much further apart than regular pop ups and their run times extended because they deliver water slowly, and in a regulated way (which is what you want from retic)

•https://www.hunterindustries.com/en-metric/irrigation-product/nozzles/mp-rotator
•http://www.toro.com.au/product/toro-570z-classic-series

Try to control the water with a hunter Hydrawise controller.
(Rachio is also another good controller)
Avoid the antiquated "dumb" controllers
Web based irrigation control is the way forward. I saved 60% on my programmed water use this summer by using a 'smart' controller v the old school box on a wall.
MP rotators by Hunter.
I use Toro sprinkler bodies to fit them to.

You might find Hunter MP rotators on eBay at good prices.

Remember, they need to be spaced much further apart than regular pop ups and their run times extended because they deliver water slowly, and in a regulated way (which is what you want from retic)

•https://www.hunterindustries.com/en-metric/irrigation-product/nozzles/mp-rotator
•http://www.toro.com.au/product/toro-570z-classic-series

Try to control the water with a hunter Hydrawise controller.
(Rachio is also another good controller)
Avoid the antiquated "dumb" controllers
Web based irrigation control is the way forward. I saved 60% on my programmed water use this summer by using a 'smart' controller v the old school box on a wall.
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2
May 01, 2017 7:08 pm
Repaint it. dark fences are an excellent way to make a fence disappear from a landscape. They will allow foliage to stand out more.
I prefer to use a dark grey or blue grey to get that boundary to fade away as a focal point.
Repaint it. dark fences are an excellent way to make a fence disappear from a landscape. They will allow foliage to stand out more.
I prefer to use a dark grey or blue grey to get that boundary to fade away as a focal point.
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4
May 01, 2017 7:05 pm
Water and soil space will be a challange.
Small pots will dry out in hours in windy or hot conditions.
With a plant that may have a large area of foliage and only a small root system to provide it from a small soil space, it will be a lot of water that it needs to keep all that hydrated in the warmer months.
if you feel compelled to follow the idea, it might be best to get a hold of a tap timer that is designed for those back yard misting systems. One that can be programmed for short bursts of water frequently. problem solved.
A nice addition to the pots might be a Chinese Star Jasmine called "Flat Mat'. It's tough, fragrant, a nice cover of green and not likely to be something you replace often (if at all)
Water and soil space will be a challange.
Small pots will dry out in hours in windy or hot conditions.
With a plant that may have a large area of foliage and only a small root system to provide it from a small soil space, it will be a lot of water that it needs to keep all that hydrated in the warmer months.
if you feel compelled to follow the idea, it might be best to get a hold of a tap timer that is designed for those back yard misting systems. One that can be programmed for short bursts of water frequently. problem solved.
A nice addition to the pots might be a Chinese Star Jasmine called "Flat Mat'. It's tough, fragrant, a nice cover of green and not likely to be something you replace often (if at all)
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4
May 01, 2017 1:24 am
Please don't use lawn beetle killers.
Please don't use lawn beetle killers.
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3
May 01, 2017 1:23 am
Just dump the soil on top of the weeds.
They won't come up through the soil like some cheesey horror movie.
99% of it will die and rot into the soil.
Just dump the soil on top of the weeds.
They won't come up through the soil like some cheesey horror movie.
99% of it will die and rot into the soil.
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8
May 01, 2017 1:20 am
Oh and the worms, Hammerhead worms.
They can be a bit sticky. Wonderful that you have them.

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/ ... e-creature
Oh and the worms, Hammerhead worms.
They can be a bit sticky. Wonderful that you have them.

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/ ... e-creature
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7
May 01, 2017 1:18 am
Lol. You have some cool stuff right there. They are wonderful worms to have.

Anyway, Munns Golf Course Green is one of the best value fertilisers on the market because of it's fertiliser efficiency.
Fertiliser efficiencies are lost on many professionals, let alone consumers.

Powerfeed Troforte Lawn Feed is the ducks nuts. New on the market, it's like owning a sleeper (A car that's crazy under the bonnet and looks like a regular car outside) I have converted my street's crazy lawn guy to it.
Lol. You have some cool stuff right there. They are wonderful worms to have.

Anyway, Munns Golf Course Green is one of the best value fertilisers on the market because of it's fertiliser efficiency.
Fertiliser efficiencies are lost on many professionals, let alone consumers.

Powerfeed Troforte Lawn Feed is the ducks nuts. New on the market, it's like owning a sleeper (A car that's crazy under the bonnet and looks like a regular car outside) I have converted my street's crazy lawn guy to it.
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7
May 01, 2017 1:11 am
Not sure what's going on with my quote, so here's the reply

You shouldn't be watering that often.
Even if you were in Perth, we can water 2 times a week and with good soil prep, that's cut to once a fortnight. If you are in the Mexicos (Eastern States) it certainly won't need much, especially at this time of year.

It's not too much organic material.

I'd still check the pool isn't still there.
Not sure what's going on with my quote, so here's the reply

You shouldn't be watering that often.
Even if you were in Perth, we can water 2 times a week and with good soil prep, that's cut to once a fortnight. If you are in the Mexicos (Eastern States) it certainly won't need much, especially at this time of year.

It's not too much organic material.

I'd still check the pool isn't still there.
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6
May 01, 2017 1:09 am
dantab dantab
The Garden Whisperer The Garden Whisperer
I would hope the pool had been modified with large holes cut to ensure drainage.
Otherwise it becomes a pool again, or a bog.

The previous owner said the old pool was all smashed up before they filled in the area so I don't think the pool is the main source of the problem.

As an update, I have cut back the watering to 2 min, 3 times per day and the area has firmed up substantially.

A few people have commented that the soil we added has too much organic matter. The topsoil we added has 33% sand and 66% soil enricher / organic matter. Is this an appropriate ratio for the lawn?

I think the main problem is that original soil below the topsoil (approx 200mm - 250mm) does not drain very well. I'm hoping the organic matter overtime will actually help improve this.
dantab dantab
The Garden Whisperer The Garden Whisperer
I would hope the pool had been modified with large holes cut to ensure drainage.
Otherwise it becomes a pool again, or a bog.

The previous owner said the old pool was all smashed up before they filled in the area so I don't think the pool is the main source of the problem.

As an update, I have cut back the watering to 2 min, 3 times per day and the area has firmed up substantially.

A few people have commented that the soil we added has too much organic matter. The topsoil we added has 33% sand and 66% soil enricher / organic matter. Is this an appropriate ratio for the lawn?

I think the main problem is that original soil below the topsoil (approx 200mm - 250mm) does not drain very well. I'm hoping the organic matter overtime will actually help improve this.
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TheGardenWhisperer
User avatar
30 April 2017
11
May 01, 2017 12:40 am
What a great example of what some thought and planning can achieve.
Could I suggest you extend that bed right to that back corner. It would be a shame to have wasted space behind the shed. It's be great spot to grow some sort of food.
What a great example of what some thought and planning can achieve.
Could I suggest you extend that bed right to that back corner. It would be a shame to have wasted space behind the shed. It's be great spot to grow some sort of food.
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TheGardenWhisperer
User avatar
30 April 2017
2
May 01, 2017 12:35 am
They will grow fine, however, be careful planting medium sized trees along fence lines. Your neighbours may not want them as much as you.

I wouldn't do it on an urban block (exceptions are always found) myself, a rural one though would look amazing.
They will grow fine, however, be careful planting medium sized trees along fence lines. Your neighbours may not want them as much as you.

I wouldn't do it on an urban block (exceptions are always found) myself, a rural one though would look amazing.
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TheGardenWhisperer
User avatar
30 April 2017
2
May 01, 2017 12:32 am
1. I have some in beds just 30cm deep from the fence and I don't look at the fence.

2. Drop the plants in a pace a part, that will be about a metre. Don't fluff about with a tape measure for this.

3. Organic material is not permanent. So don't go to extra ordinary amounts of work to achieve something that makes you feel good, but achieves little long term. Focus on permanent soil improvement, using zeolite, course sands, and a simple high grade compost. Avoid fresh manures when planting. We know from research that most of it will end up elsewhere and the plant won't get much.

If you have clay, work out which one because Gypsum is not reactive to most of Australia's clays but the most commonly used. Go figure. Many clays need Dolomite of lime instead. Gypsum will also take around 4 years to have an effect on the soil's structure when used on the correct clay.
http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s1676965.htm

4. Best time to plant is now because it's not as good as last year but better than next October. The whole nursery and landscape industry doesn't stop in less ideal conditions, nor should you. Get planting.
They will go yellow in the cold, don't spend money on them. Let them have a cry about the conditions and they'll green up when the soil warms up (Not the air).

Feed the soil only with composted organic material, better still mulch what you clip and throw straight under them fresh.
If minerals are applied, only Rock Dust/Minerals or the new Powerfeed Troforté sold at the big shed every goes to.

Clip them even when small. Let them grow and clip back a little.
The more you clip, the better the hedge.
1. I have some in beds just 30cm deep from the fence and I don't look at the fence.

2. Drop the plants in a pace a part, that will be about a metre. Don't fluff about with a tape measure for this.

3. Organic material is not permanent. So don't go to extra ordinary amounts of work to achieve something that makes you feel good, but achieves little long term. Focus on permanent soil improvement, using zeolite, course sands, and a simple high grade compost. Avoid fresh manures when planting. We know from research that most of it will end up elsewhere and the plant won't get much.

If you have clay, work out which one because Gypsum is not reactive to most of Australia's clays but the most commonly used. Go figure. Many clays need Dolomite of lime instead. Gypsum will also take around 4 years to have an effect on the soil's structure when used on the correct clay.
http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s1676965.htm

4. Best time to plant is now because it's not as good as last year but better than next October. The whole nursery and landscape industry doesn't stop in less ideal conditions, nor should you. Get planting.
They will go yellow in the cold, don't spend money on them. Let them have a cry about the conditions and they'll green up when the soil warms up (Not the air).

Feed the soil only with composted organic material, better still mulch what you clip and throw straight under them fresh.
If minerals are applied, only Rock Dust/Minerals or the new Powerfeed Troforté sold at the big shed every goes to.

Clip them even when small. Let them grow and clip back a little.
The more you clip, the better the hedge.
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TheGardenWhisperer
User avatar
30 April 2017
9
May 01, 2017 12:12 am
Replace it with a dwarf Apple or Pear. There are quite a few varieties to choose from.

Pinkabelle is one that comes to mind. It would a be perfect size.

The Little Gems should come away from the house a bit. Not such an issue like the Pears are. You might not get the best out of them though.
Replace it with a dwarf Apple or Pear. There are quite a few varieties to choose from.

Pinkabelle is one that comes to mind. It would a be perfect size.

The Little Gems should come away from the house a bit. Not such an issue like the Pears are. You might not get the best out of them though.
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TheGardenWhisperer
User avatar
30 April 2017
5
May 01, 2017 12:06 am
Advanced tree nurseries will have skills and knowledge on trees beyond what garden centres offer.
They will also tend to have healthier trees, as growing trees in containers incorrectly or for too long can create their own set of problems.
Advanced tree nurseries will have skills and knowledge on trees beyond what garden centres offer.
They will also tend to have healthier trees, as growing trees in containers incorrectly or for too long can create their own set of problems.
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TheGardenWhisperer
User avatar
28 March 2017
9
Mar 28, 2017 12:21 am
Just quietly, I'd cut 'em back half their size. However, BeatrixKiddo is on the money. For the less adventurous or skilled, it's sound advice.

Why would I cut lower? To encourage more growth lower down on the plant. Clipping ⅓ on those lanky things, you'll possibly get some open areas lower down. Too much new growth up high.

Have a go, should look good.
Just quietly, I'd cut 'em back half their size. However, BeatrixKiddo is on the money. For the less adventurous or skilled, it's sound advice.

Why would I cut lower? To encourage more growth lower down on the plant. Clipping ⅓ on those lanky things, you'll possibly get some open areas lower down. Too much new growth up high.

Have a go, should look good.
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