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Pixelated
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Pixelated
User avatar
9 November 2010
33
Nov 09, 2010 10:08 am
Hi all,

I've been following this thread with interest as we have 600x600 matt porcelain tiles.

Regarding the wax coating -- the tile shop we purchased from told me to use Cleaning Vinegar in a 1:1 solution with boiling water. As I had never heard of Cleaning Vinegar I did not take their advice and tried all kinds of other specialist products with no success.

I then tracked down the Cleaning Vinegar (yes...there it was in the cleaning aisle of of the local supermarket) and it worked a treat! It removed the waxy coating *completely*.

For what it's worth (and I won't go into all the details cos it's a Days of Our Lives saga) one thing I would be cautious of that nobody seems to have mentioned regarding *ANY* large format tile from either China, Italy, Upper or Lower Mongolia etc etc is the flatness of the tile.

Some of our tiles have a very slight ripple in them which is obvious in sidelit situations. We've had this investigated via one of Howard Ryan's specialist contacts and I can confirm the following:

- our tiles are not seconds and this is a regular occurance;
- you will not notice this 'problem' in tile showrooms because of their overhead lighting..versus homes where large windows allow natural daylight to flood in at an angle thus highlighting the 'problem';
- the problem is not considered a fault because the Australian Standard, based on the International Standard, is flawed and allows for this since the standard was compiled by the tile manufacturers themselves!
- caveat emptor -- be aware of this and be wary of any sample given to you as chances are it will NOT be a tile with any obvious ripple in it.

Good luck...Pix
Hi all,

I've been following this thread with interest as we have 600x600 matt porcelain tiles.

Regarding the wax coating -- the tile shop we purchased from told me to use Cleaning Vinegar in a 1:1 solution with boiling water. As I had never heard of Cleaning Vinegar I did not take their advice and tried all kinds of other specialist products with no success.

I then tracked down the Cleaning Vinegar (yes...there it was in the cleaning aisle of of the local supermarket) and it worked a treat! It removed the waxy coating *completely*.

For what it's worth (and I won't go into all the details cos it's a Days of Our Lives saga) one thing I would be cautious of that nobody seems to have mentioned regarding *ANY* large format tile from either China, Italy, Upper or Lower Mongolia etc etc is the flatness of the tile.

Some of our tiles have a very slight ripple in them which is obvious in sidelit situations. We've had this investigated via one of Howard Ryan's specialist contacts and I can confirm the following:

- our tiles are not seconds and this is a regular occurance;
- you will not notice this 'problem' in tile showrooms because of their overhead lighting..versus homes where large windows allow natural daylight to flood in at an angle thus highlighting the 'problem';
- the problem is not considered a fault because the Australian Standard, based on the International Standard, is flawed and allows for this since the standard was compiled by the tile manufacturers themselves!
- caveat emptor -- be aware of this and be wary of any sample given to you as chances are it will NOT be a tile with any obvious ripple in it.

Good luck...Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
30 May 2010
10
May 30, 2010 12:25 pm
Chorlton,

I don't actually know if we paid more to get the 600mmx600mm laid as I was quoted a price for the job. As we didn't consider a smaller size I have no point of comparison. Sorry.

Pix
Chorlton,

I don't actually know if we paid more to get the 600mmx600mm laid as I was quoted a price for the job. As we didn't consider a smaller size I have no point of comparison. Sorry.

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
28 May 2010
1
May 28, 2010 1:21 pm
Hey All,

Just wanted to say that we had our handover today :-)

It's certainly been an interesting journey of ups and downs and one which will continue as we have so much to do now ourselves. We can't do as much as we would like, however, because of all the rain in Sydney lately. The gradient on our site, gentle as it is, means we have a mud slope at the front of the house. For practical reasons, we want a driveway and front steps in place asap and our concreter can't start until the rain stops and the site dries out for a few days.

I can't speak highly enough of our builder and the wonderful staff we've dealt with including Emma, Leslie and Steve. Of course, there have been problems but building is about how to solve those problems and this team have been great.

The HomeOne forum has been a great resource and I hope to revisit for information, a giggle, help and feedback in future.

Pix xxx
Hey All,

Just wanted to say that we had our handover today :-)

It's certainly been an interesting journey of ups and downs and one which will continue as we have so much to do now ourselves. We can't do as much as we would like, however, because of all the rain in Sydney lately. The gradient on our site, gentle as it is, means we have a mud slope at the front of the house. For practical reasons, we want a driveway and front steps in place asap and our concreter can't start until the rain stops and the site dries out for a few days.

I can't speak highly enough of our builder and the wonderful staff we've dealt with including Emma, Leslie and Steve. Of course, there have been problems but building is about how to solve those problems and this team have been great.

The HomeOne forum has been a great resource and I hope to revisit for information, a giggle, help and feedback in future.

Pix xxx
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Pixelated
User avatar
25 May 2010
3
May 25, 2010 7:57 pm
Our builder uses Beaumont and I think their service is lousy and their prices (even at sale time) are less than competitive. We had to use them for the wet areas or else get pittance back as a credit.

Versatile Features are very good (outlets around Sydney) however, even better is their factory outlet at Prospect where they have all the same stock genuinely marked down from their retail store prices. The outlet is called More Ceramic Tiles.

We purchased approx 100 sq m of 600x600 matte porcelain and have been very happy with the service and the quality.

Pix
Our builder uses Beaumont and I think their service is lousy and their prices (even at sale time) are less than competitive. We had to use them for the wet areas or else get pittance back as a credit.

Versatile Features are very good (outlets around Sydney) however, even better is their factory outlet at Prospect where they have all the same stock genuinely marked down from their retail store prices. The outlet is called More Ceramic Tiles.

We purchased approx 100 sq m of 600x600 matte porcelain and have been very happy with the service and the quality.

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
24 May 2010
14
May 24, 2010 11:32 pm
Thanks everyone.

The SS came up with a solution that will work :-) Replace the existing skirting in the carpeted area adjacent to the tiles with taller skirting so the heights look the same. We'll do this after handover and clever husband has already costed it at less than $50 !!!

No point in cutting down the skirting in the tiled area (90% of the ground floor) because we paid extra for the increased height :-)

Thanks for all the suggestions -- this was really making me crazy!

Pix
Thanks everyone.

The SS came up with a solution that will work :-) Replace the existing skirting in the carpeted area adjacent to the tiles with taller skirting so the heights look the same. We'll do this after handover and clever husband has already costed it at less than $50 !!!

No point in cutting down the skirting in the tiled area (90% of the ground floor) because we paid extra for the increased height :-)

Thanks for all the suggestions -- this was really making me crazy!

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
22 May 2010
12
May 22, 2010 5:12 pm
Hi Cherub,

If we do that, how do we reconcile the different heights of the skirting between the two areas? Remember, the skirting will be fixed on top of the tiles and on top of the plywood and carpet is laid in front and up to the skirting in this area, not beneath it.

Pix
Hi Cherub,

If we do that, how do we reconcile the different heights of the skirting between the two areas? Remember, the skirting will be fixed on top of the tiles and on top of the plywood and carpet is laid in front and up to the skirting in this area, not beneath it.

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
22 May 2010
10
May 22, 2010 9:04 am
The skirting is tacked on in the area to be tiled and also in the area to be carpeted. The latter was a mistake by the chippies and we are working to fix this so that it will be fixed.

We wanted the skirting tacked on in the tiled area so that it can be removed while the tiling takes place and fixed permanently afterwards. We just prefer the look of skirting on top of the tiles rather than tiles butting up to the skirting with a grout line in between.

As carpet sits against skirting we've come to the conclusion we're going to have to live with skirting in two adjacent areas that *looks* like it's a different height...however, we still have the problem of how to overcome the disparity in the skirting levels in the spots (in four areas) where the carpet and tiles meet.

Any ideas or is this all getting just waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay to boring and hard? LOL (it is for me)

/me wishes someone could just wave a magic wand and solve this! hehehehe

Pix
The skirting is tacked on in the area to be tiled and also in the area to be carpeted. The latter was a mistake by the chippies and we are working to fix this so that it will be fixed.

We wanted the skirting tacked on in the tiled area so that it can be removed while the tiling takes place and fixed permanently afterwards. We just prefer the look of skirting on top of the tiles rather than tiles butting up to the skirting with a grout line in between.

As carpet sits against skirting we've come to the conclusion we're going to have to live with skirting in two adjacent areas that *looks* like it's a different height...however, we still have the problem of how to overcome the disparity in the skirting levels in the spots (in four areas) where the carpet and tiles meet.

Any ideas or is this all getting just waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay to boring and hard? LOL (it is for me)

/me wishes someone could just wave a magic wand and solve this! hehehehe

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
21 May 2010
4
May 21, 2010 12:55 pm
Hiya,

Sara is correct, when porcelain chips you don't see the clay 'biscuit' underneath, as porcelain is colour-through. I also like the very small grout gaps with porcelain, however, not only is the product more expensive in the first instance, but preparing the surface is also costly and can present problems. See my thread for more on this: viewtopic.php?f=7&t=33919

We are just about to lay 600x600 matt porcelain tiles and I still can't reconcile the differing floor levels between tile and what will be carpeted. Ceramic tiles seem much, much easier to deal with.

However, it's about a certain aesthetic. Which do you prefer the look of?

Pix :-)
Hiya,

Sara is correct, when porcelain chips you don't see the clay 'biscuit' underneath, as porcelain is colour-through. I also like the very small grout gaps with porcelain, however, not only is the product more expensive in the first instance, but preparing the surface is also costly and can present problems. See my thread for more on this: - l -->viewtopic.php?f=7&t=33919- l -->

We are just about to lay 600x600 matt porcelain tiles and I still can't reconcile the differing floor levels between tile and what will be carpeted. Ceramic tiles seem much, much easier to deal with.

However, it's about a certain aesthetic. Which do you prefer the look of?

Pix :-)
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Pixelated
User avatar
21 May 2010
8
May 21, 2010 12:48 pm
Thanks Ash, namtrak & Felistopher :-)

After following up on your suggestions I now have a much better idea of the alternatives available. I've spoken to our carpet layers and they say they can either use the MDF wedges or custom build a ramp from a compound, mixed with water, and feathered.

However....

Unless I raise the entire floor level, what do people usually do with skirtings in the transition area, where the tiles and the carpet meet? Won't those skirtings 'float' and look a bit odd?

Ash, I have spoken to the tiler and they confirmed the finished floor level will be between 35-40mm *above* the slab. This is because of the depth of the screed bed required for large format porcelain tiles. The surface must be *completely* level otherwise the tiles will be out-of-whack when laid. Ceramic tiles, esp smaller ones, can be glued directly onto a slab but unfortunately we can't get away with this.

Once again...feedback much appreciated!!

Pix
Thanks Ash, namtrak & Felistopher :-)

After following up on your suggestions I now have a much better idea of the alternatives available. I've spoken to our carpet layers and they say they can either use the MDF wedges or custom build a ramp from a compound, mixed with water, and feathered.

However....

Unless I raise the entire floor level, what do people usually do with skirtings in the transition area, where the tiles and the carpet meet? Won't those skirtings 'float' and look a bit odd?

Ash, I have spoken to the tiler and they confirmed the finished floor level will be between 35-40mm *above* the slab. This is because of the depth of the screed bed required for large format porcelain tiles. The surface must be *completely* level otherwise the tiles will be out-of-whack when laid. Ceramic tiles, esp smaller ones, can be glued directly onto a slab but unfortunately we can't get away with this.

Once again...feedback much appreciated!!

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
20 May 2010
3
May 20, 2010 7:21 pm
Thanks for that namtrak, but we're not sure about those 'ramps'... for want of a better expression.

Is this how most of these situations are handled?

Pix
Thanks for that namtrak, but we're not sure about those 'ramps'... for want of a better expression.

Is this how most of these situations are handled?

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
20 May 2010
1
May 20, 2010 7:00 pm
Hi all...I'm hoping someone who's experienced this or one of the flooring experts can assist please.

We are having 600x600 matt porcelain tiles laid on our ground floor (slab) except for a formal living area on the RHS where we will lay carpet. I can't get my head around how to deal with the differing floor levels as everyone has a different fix. I've seen many examples of tiles butting up to carpet but not sure how to achieve a uniform floor level.

The tiles will be laid on a screed bed and the finished level will be 35-38mm higher than the current slab. The carpet people advise that the carpet sits approximately 20mm above the slab when installed so that's a difference of 15-18mm between the finished level of the tiles and the carpet.

One option presented is to continue the screed into the Formal living room allowing for that difference. However, the tiler says the carpet people should just lay thick underlay! The carpet people say this is not a serious solution and they told me to get a carpenter to lay particle board, or similar, to make up the difference. However, the chippy I spoke to says you can't just lay particle board on a slab...and round and round it goes.

Any advice on how to deal with this would help me sleep better at night!!

Pix
Hi all...I'm hoping someone who's experienced this or one of the flooring experts can assist please.

We are having 600x600 matt porcelain tiles laid on our ground floor (slab) except for a formal living area on the RHS where we will lay carpet. I can't get my head around how to deal with the differing floor levels as everyone has a different fix. I've seen many examples of tiles butting up to carpet but not sure how to achieve a uniform floor level.

The tiles will be laid on a screed bed and the finished level will be 35-38mm higher than the current slab. The carpet people advise that the carpet sits approximately 20mm above the slab when installed so that's a difference of 15-18mm between the finished level of the tiles and the carpet.

One option presented is to continue the screed into the Formal living room allowing for that difference. However, the tiler says the carpet people should just lay thick underlay! The carpet people say this is not a serious solution and they told me to get a carpenter to lay particle board, or similar, to make up the difference. However, the chippy I spoke to says you can't just lay particle board on a slab...and round and round it goes.

Any advice on how to deal with this would help me sleep better at night!!

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
29 April 2010
10
Apr 29, 2010 8:55 pm
I agree with rubber_noggin, however, you could take it a step further...

In NSW you can make an application to the CTTT (Consumer Trading & Tenancy Tribunal) to either force the Owners Corporation to act by way of an order or you could apply for an order against a particular owner. These orders are legally binding and if ignored the relevant party can wind up in court facing hefty penalties.

I would be pretty sure in your state you have a similar body.

Pix
I agree with rubber_noggin, however, you could take it a step further...

In NSW you can make an application to the CTTT (Consumer Trading & Tenancy Tribunal) to either force the Owners Corporation to act by way of an order or you could apply for an order against a particular owner. These orders are legally binding and if ignored the relevant party can wind up in court facing hefty penalties.

I would be pretty sure in your state you have a similar body.

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
29 April 2010
6
Apr 29, 2010 8:45 pm
I would be more concerned about matching or co-ordinating the colour of the downpipes to your wall colour.

Are you using face brick or render/bagged finish?

We have a Windspray roof/gutter/fascia but as our bricks are a dark blue colour we chose Ironstone downpipes so they blend into the colour of the face brick rather than stand out. I take a live and let live approach but personally I didn't want to have downpipes as a feature :-)

Pix
I would be more concerned about matching or co-ordinating the colour of the downpipes to your wall colour.

Are you using face brick or render/bagged finish?

We have a Windspray roof/gutter/fascia but as our bricks are a dark blue colour we chose Ironstone downpipes so they blend into the colour of the face brick rather than stand out. I take a live and let live approach but personally I didn't want to have downpipes as a feature :-)

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
27 April 2010
28
Apr 27, 2010 9:28 pm
I rest my case.
I rest my case.
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Pixelated
User avatar
25 April 2010
26
Apr 25, 2010 11:16 pm
I'll believe in Feng Shui when I see the evidence. Personally, I don't believe in superstitions and unverified claims any more than I believe that pigs can fly.

However, I take a live and let live approach. If others want to believe in something... I'm not about to proselytize. I will clarify that I was not mocking these beliefs but merely asking the question whether Feng Shui is taken seriously or viewed in a more lighthearted way such as occult-based practices like Tarot cards, water divination, astrology and other superstitions, because as far as I can tell, Feng Shui is certainly not evidence-based. Personal anecdotes simply don't stack up.

On another point, this forum is generally a great resource visited by many wonderful people but I have observed from time-to-time an impatience toward those who question the status quo or dare to posit an alternate opinion. I will always continue to ask questions and make no apology for this. If this makes people uncomfortable then cest la vie. For those people who find it necessary to have the last word, go ahead and attack me -- it just serves to prove my point.
I'll believe in Feng Shui when I see the evidence. Personally, I don't believe in superstitions and unverified claims any more than I believe that pigs can fly.

However, I take a live and let live approach. If others want to believe in something... I'm not about to proselytize. I will clarify that I was not mocking these beliefs but merely asking the question whether Feng Shui is taken seriously or viewed in a more lighthearted way such as occult-based practices like Tarot cards, water divination, astrology and other superstitions, because as far as I can tell, Feng Shui is certainly not evidence-based. Personal anecdotes simply don't stack up.

On another point, this forum is generally a great resource visited by many wonderful people but I have observed from time-to-time an impatience toward those who question the status quo or dare to posit an alternate opinion. I will always continue to ask questions and make no apology for this. If this makes people uncomfortable then cest la vie. For those people who find it necessary to have the last word, go ahead and attack me -- it just serves to prove my point.
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Pixelated
User avatar
25 April 2010
45
Apr 25, 2010 10:45 am
I agree with all the comments -- your house is looking fabulous.

I think the thing I like the most is your risk-taking with the colours (facade and kitchen splashback) :-)

Best wishes for handover...Pix
I agree with all the comments -- your house is looking fabulous.

I think the thing I like the most is your risk-taking with the colours (facade and kitchen splashback) :-)

Best wishes for handover...Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
24 April 2010
24
Apr 24, 2010 10:37 am
Hmmmm...

And people once believed the earth was flat too.

Pix

(edited for spelling mistake)
Hmmmm...

And people once believed the earth was flat too.

Pix

(edited for spelling mistake)
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Pixelated
User avatar
21 April 2010
35
Apr 21, 2010 1:06 pm
We had the same experience in dealing with the Call Centre staff at Telstra. They kept telling me we had a connection in place even after I explained about 5 times that we knocked down the old house and built a new one and there was NO connection!!! I felt like it would be less painful if I'd have slammed my head into a brick wall a few times.

Navigating the Telstra website is just as hard but my oh-so-clever DH did finally found a link that was buried deep within the Telstra pages!

It turns out that if we dig the trench ourselves (and we will cos I'm not paying $200++ for someone to dig a ditch for me!!) the $299 connection fee *INCLUDES* the 3rd-party contractor, in our case Silcar, feeding cables through the conduit. We want to change providers however, and they charge you $100 if you switch within the first 3 months. We have accepted that this is just part of the cost of achieving what we want.

Pix
We had the same experience in dealing with the Call Centre staff at Telstra. They kept telling me we had a connection in place even after I explained about 5 times that we knocked down the old house and built a new one and there was NO connection!!! I felt like it would be less painful if I'd have slammed my head into a brick wall a few times.

Navigating the Telstra website is just as hard but my oh-so-clever DH did finally found a link that was buried deep within the Telstra pages!

It turns out that if we dig the trench ourselves (and we will cos I'm not paying $200++ for someone to dig a ditch for me!!) the $299 connection fee *INCLUDES* the 3rd-party contractor, in our case Silcar, feeding cables through the conduit. We want to change providers however, and they charge you $100 if you switch within the first 3 months. We have accepted that this is just part of the cost of achieving what we want.

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
21 April 2010
19
Apr 21, 2010 12:56 pm
Nobody seriously believes this do they????

Next we'll be conducting ceremonies to rid us of the ''evil spirits'' lol

Pix
Nobody seriously believes this do they????

Next we'll be conducting ceremonies to rid us of the ''evil spirits'' lol

Pix
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Pixelated
User avatar
15 April 2010
4
Apr 15, 2010 2:42 am
The top end Reece plumbing stores in Sydney (Surry Hills and Mosman) have one for around $15K. It's a more modern look than the tub featured in that pic and it is square.

I think it looks lovely and would make quite a statement -- but wouldn't be comfortable or practical. Somehow I think if you're going to buy the Reece bath it would be a triumph of form over function.

Pix
The top end Reece plumbing stores in Sydney (Surry Hills and Mosman) have one for around $15K. It's a more modern look than the tub featured in that pic and it is square.

I think it looks lovely and would make quite a statement -- but wouldn't be comfortable or practical. Somehow I think if you're going to buy the Reece bath it would be a triumph of form over function.

Pix
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